Work-based Learning Approach

This approach includes authentic, simulation and role-play based learning where the emphasis is on students experiencing and learning in real-world situations. this video is a discussion about Work-Based Learning between staff at the University of Derby:

This video is an example of an authentic learning activity

Examples:

  • Aldrich argues that simulations are an effective way to engage learners in real, authentic learning (Aldrich, 2004)
  • Jan Herrington describes 9 elements of authentic learning = Provide authentic contexts that reflect the way the knowledge will be used in real life; Provide authentic tasks and activities; Provide access to expert performances and the modelling of processes; Provide multiple roles and perspectives; Support collaborative construction of knowledge; Promote reflection to enable abstractions to be formed; Promote articulation to enable tacit knowledge to be made explicit; Provide coaching and scaffolding by the teacher at critical times; Provide for authentic assessment of learning within the tasks (Herrington & Oliver, 2000)

The ideas for technology enhanced learning activities below use a range of tools and are based on the Best Practice Principles.

Activities using Wikis

  • Wiki pages can be created, edited and shared by users. This video is an overview of how they work:

Tools

Suggested learning activities that are mapped to the Best Practice Principles are below.

Active Induction

Guided Exploration

Facilitated Investigation

Self-organised Learner

Student access wikis prepared by tutor Students find and evaluate wikis Students work in groups to create and share learning materials on wikis Students create own wikis for learning and sharing in community

Activities using E-Portfolios

  • e-Portfolios are user-selected materials that typically demonstrate evidence of activities, examples of work and reflections on experience. They are often prepared during work experience or for employers. Some useful guides include: ‘JISC Effective Practice with e-Portfolios’; and JISC InfoNet: e-Portfolios
  • Tools for e-Portfolios include Blackboard e-Portfolio, and WordPress
  • Suggested learning activities that are mapped to the Best Practice Principles are below.

Active Induction

Guided Exploration

Facilitated Investigation

Self-organised Learner

Students access e-portfolio Student selects appropriate content to add Student manages e-portfolio Student shares e-portfolio with employers etc
Students create basic page structures based on template provided by tutor Students view and evaluate sample portfolios Students reflect on own and peers’ portfolio Students reflect on resources/ portfolio and skills demonstrated
Students map assignment to criteria Students select and submit e-resources for feedback Peer feedback used to develop resources Student presents e-portfolio for assessment /employer/ professional organisation
Student groups assigned a research topic Students research topic and create ePortfolio ePortfolios shared with cohort for comments Students complete individual assignment drawing on ePortfolio
Students take photos/ videos of own practical skills Students upload photos/ videos with keywords

 

Students update webfolio with additional images/ assets/ commentary to demonstrate skill development Students reflect on tutor’s feedback and updates action plan
Students create ePortfolio of treatment plans based on clinical case studies Students use assessment rubric to grade own ePortfolio Students use assessment rubric to peer-assess a peer’s ePortfolio Students submit ePortfolio to tutor for grading
Students create webfolio of activities over year

 

Students complete ‘capstone’ activity to draw together range of learning experiences Students share webfolio with tutors and professional organisations for accreditation  Webfolio is structured to reflect professional standards

(A number of these activities were adapted from the book Pebblegogy)

Other Models

Case studies

Activities using Mobile Devices

  • Most students now have access to their own laptops and smartphones for learning
  • Suggestions for apps include RefME (iPhone and Android), Lecture Capture (iPhone) and LectureRecordings (Android), and StudyBlue (iPhone and Android)
  • Mobile apps are available for Blackboard Learn and Collaborate
  • Suggested learning activities that are mapped to the Best Practice Principles are below.

Active Induction

Guided Exploration

Facilitated Investigation

Self-organised Learner

Students sign up for SMS alerts Students access weekly updates and announcements via SMS or RSS Students contribute annotations/ comments / content to group web page /wiki Use calendar to plan own work schedule
Students access course announcements Students access web links of relevant resources  Upload audio comments /feedback /research findings via iPadio or voicethread Log keeping/ e-portfolio building in the field/ work-based.
Students access FAQ Access Blackboard forums Upload images to blog / image sharing site Create video to upload to e-portfolio
Engage in location based game/ activity Online quiz on content/skills with instant feedback Create podcasts /video to share  Gaming/scenarios/simulation

Case studies

Activities using Smartboards

  • Guide to locations of and function of Interactive Whiteboards is here
  • Suggested learning activities that are mapped to the Best Practice Principles are below.

Active Induction

Guided Exploration

Facilitated Investigation

Self-organised Learner

Tutor displays PPT of activities/content Students annotate image/ content Students use subject specific software for experiment/ simulation etc Students present own project/ content/ video on IWB
Tutor shows video/plays audio of content Students complete quiz Students collaborate on research tasks on board Students use IWB to collaborate on tasks with concept map/wiki etc
Tutor saves notes/ annotations etc and stores on VLE  Tutor demonstrates use of software/tool on board Students create resource to share on board Students create quiz to share with peers on board

Case studies

Activities using Discussion Forums

  • Consider how a face-to-face group discussion might differ from an online one with these notes. Create challenging, engaging discussion questions, debates and activities using a critical thinking framework
  • Assess online discussions using the recommendations and rubrics suggested in these notes
  • Tools for discussion forums include Blackboard and Voicethread
  • Suggested learning activities that are mapped to the Best Practice Principles are below.

Active Induction

Guided Exploration

Facilitated Investigation

Self-organised Learner

Participation in informal forums for peer socialisation and induction Participation in informal forums for peer sharing and support Students use group forum to organise group work/ projects Students set up own forums, to plan and support group work/ projects
 Participation in forum set up by tutor Student selects topic/ approach for discussion. Students moderate discussion and provide summary Students invite/ interviews externals
Students review guidelines for effective learning in discussions Participation in discussion of process of learning through discussion Students explore issues in learning in online discussions Peers discuss and reflect on process of learning through discussion
Students review assessment criteria/ rubric for online discussions Tutor comments on content and process and offers feedback against assessment criteria/ rubric Students comment and offer feedback to peers against assessment criteria/ rubric Tutor provides summative assessment against assessment criteria/ rubric
(Delphi) Each student poses question (Delphi) Each student responds to another student’s question (Delphi) Each student comments on another student’s response (Delphi) Students review and reflect on questions, responses and comments
(Debate) Students read stimulus material and post individual statement (Debate) Students work in groups to agree and post a supporting or opposing argument (Debate) Students post responses to arguments (Debate) Students vote and review conclusions
(Role-play) Students read stimulus materials for situation/ problem (Role-play) Students assigned roles and review context and problem (Role-play) Students, in role, post responses to situation/ problem (Role-play) Students contribute final conclusion and reflect
(Muddiest point) Students read material and add question/ comment on their ‘muddiest point’ (Muddiest point) Students read material and other students’ questions and contribute comments
(BOLD) Students post individual question/ reflection or critique on reading (BOLD) Student teams work together to produce team items (e.g., unresolved, re-written individual items) (BOLD) Teams offers peer critique and tutor offers comment/ feedback (BOLD): Participation in extended discussion with summary

Other Models for Online Discussion Activities:

Case studies

Research

Activities using Blogs

Active Induction

Guided Exploration

Facilitated Investigation

Self-organised Learner

Students read tutor’s blog/ Tweets Students read other external recommended blogs/ Tweets Students search for, evaluate and recommend blogs/ Tweets Students develop own set of networked blogs/ Tweets
Students read tutor’s blog for updates Students read blogs recommended by Tutor Students search and find relevant blogs to read from external professionals/ experts Students reflect on use of blogs in learning
Tutor adds comments to blog Self evaluation of blog on blog Peer assessment of groups’ blogs Tutor comments on evaluation on blog

Other Models

Case studies

Research