World Café: a participatory research tool for the criminologist engaged in seeking world views for transformation

Sarah Page and Em Temple-Malt’s paper titled ‘World Café: a participatory research tool for the criminologist engaged in seeking world views for transformation’ has been published. Sarah said she is ‘very excited to have our paper finally out there in print!’

The paper demonstrates how Em and Sarah used the World Cafe approach to gain insights into NPS (New Psychoactive substances) drug usage levels with young people and the homeless population.

‘World Café offers an alternative data collection methodology using group discussion in a face-to-face environment (Brown with Issacs, 2005).[…] we attempt to reflect on applying World Café with vulnerable groups in society on their understanding and consumption levels of NPS and give some examples of the ethical and data issues experienced.’

The research is co-produce with undergraduate and alumni students and the project was the launch of the Crime and Society Research Group.

‘Staffordshire University Crime and Society Research
Group draws upon a variety of options for delivering
research and evaluations in the field of Criminology and
Sociology that are bespoke for organisations and partnerships. Our research provides recommendations for reducing crime and offers helpful insights into meeting the changing needs
of society.’

“The project originally got Vice Chancellor/research funding to conduct a piece of research that enhanced new teaching delivery. The research informed both my Sociology of Health and Working with Drug Users modules and has assisted with building relationships with our local public health team at the local authority.”

“It was fab to work with Em and team on this project.”

Sarah went on to say that “it has [also] contributed to Em’s Research Methods teaching – we are pretty much the only uni[versity] offering World Cafe methodology training to our UG students. On an impact level, drug service improvements occurred with local homeless hostels (with the most significant drug issues) getting a drop in service set up on their premises.”

The paper is based on a presentation that Sarah and Em delivered at the British Society of Criminology in June.

The NPS research (particularly focused on monkey dust) is being continued this year and Sarah has a final year student working with herself and Public Health on this. “We are now looking at the impact of NPS drugs on local communities.”

Click here to read the publication.

 

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