Learning but not as we recognise it

A blog written by Paul Orsmond – Senior lecturer (Tef) in Biological and Biomedical Sciences

Most research carried out into learning in higher education (HE) is within the context of teaching, and a tutor-designed curriculum. Here the research is driven by questions such as ‘what sort of learning do we want’? Such research helps address higher education metrics, such as academic performance indicators that track and provide a measure of performances and achievement. Metrics are now strongly ingrained into higher education that it is understandable why student acquired learning is recognised as the only learning of worth taking place in higher education. Of course, it isn’t.

Our research explores the rich everyday learning that students naturally engage in with their peers within university, but outside the tutor curriculum. Such learning can be extended, encompassing student learning arising from engagement with family and friends. This participatory learning addresses questions about ‘what learning do we have now’?

A lack of awareness of this ‘other’ learning taking place in higher education presents a problem. At present there is a disparity between employer expectations and employee qualifications. Quite rightly HE invests in preparing students for the workplace. But there is gap in this preparation and it is one that our research well illustrates.

Our research shows that many of our students in the Department of Biological Sciences at Staffordshire University are developing key employability skills through their participatory learning, learning outside the curriculum, and learning not driven by HE metrics. Such learning is taking place every day but remains unrecognised. This is what we call ‘invisible’ learning. Students and higher education institutions, therefore, do not appreciate, or recognise this invisible learning. Hence are not focused on these skills being developed and refined. Through our research we hope to make the richness of this learning more visible, making our students more aware of their potential to achieve.

The Pathway to Becoming a Biologist

Written by Dr Sarah Williams – course Leader for Biomedical Science 

The Pathway to Becoming a Biologist

I should be clear from the start, I’m loose with my term biologist.  I am a true believer in the concept of ‘One Biology’ so whether your biology is more towards the biomedical or more aligned with the ecological (or maybe you don’t even know yet?) – I still mean YOU. 

What a situation we find ourselves in, sitting at home doing what we can to maintain a normal work life, a normal family life, a normal social life – even though we all know none of this is normal (so we are really aiming for the impossible there) and we are all hoping that this comes to an end sooner rather than later.  But there are some positives – I see biologists everywhere.  They are providing advice to the government, they are modelling the outbreak, they are working towards a vaccine, they are designing new laboratory tests and implementing them in our hospitals (big shout out here to the NHS Healthcare Scientists – another amazing set of biologists).  They are on our TVs and our radios, they are talking to the general public, they are calm and they are collected, and I feel lucky to be one.   

I am a biologist of many labels – a human biologist, an immunologist, a clinical immunologist, a senior lecturer in biomedical science.  Those names represent an amazing journey of biology that has taken me to different ends of the country, in research labs, hospital labs, lecture theatres – and most recently my attic office.   

People often ask – what does a biologist do?  Look around you, at the moment they are difficult to miss.  However, to use a well-known adage ‘this too shall pass’ and then what?  Well, then the Biologists will move on to the all of the roles they were quietly performing before COVID19 changed all of our lives.  The Healthcare Scientists will go back behind the pathology doors, quietly processing all of our biological samples (being a part of 80 % of  diagnosis).  Research Scientists will continue to strive for answers, to tackle the World’s biggest problems.  They will push for a more sustainable future, they will work to understand disease, to enhance biodiversity, to monitor emerging threats to health, to educate, to advise, to inform.  From where I sit, the opportunities for a biologist are somewhat endless, you just need to find the first step on your path. 

Three seperate pictures of the academic staff of the Biological and Biomedical Sciences department and students in a collage.

We are all biologists, and you could be too. We will help to unlock your potential and start you on your own journey. Become a Biologist with one of our undergraduate or postgraduate courses.

From the Biological and Biomedical Sciences Department, stay safe and stay well.

World Immunisation Week 2020

A blog written by Dr Sarah Williams, Clinical Immunologist and Course Leader for Biomedical Science

 

There is a race going on right now to develop a vaccine to protect us all against the devastating consequences of COVID19.  A race that is being ‘run’ by amazing scientists around the world and cheered on by us all.

World Health Organisation’s World Immunisation Week 2020
https://www.who.int/news-room/campaigns/world-immunization-week/world-immunization-week-2020

World immunisation week, organised by the World Health Organisation, aims to promote the use of vaccines to protect people of all ages against disease. Even without the current global situation in to which we have all been plunged, the role of vaccination and immunisation was always worth celebrating and promoting. But with vaccination against COVID 19 being our best shot at returning our disrupted worlds back to our own version of normal, it is perhaps even more vital that we raise awareness of the role of immunisation in protecting and promoting health. And, as we wait and hope, I want to take some time to look at something else – those diseases we are already able to prevent because we have vaccines already. Diseases such as measles.

Measles is deadly. COVID19 is reported to have an R value of around 2.  That means, in a totally susceptible population, for every person who contracts the virus, they will infect 2 others. There are some great modelling images out there where you can visualise this.  Measles on the other hand has an R value of somewhere around 14. So, in a totally susceptible population each individual that contracts measles will infect 14 other people. Imagine how quickly this disease spreads. There is a great article which has visual models of some disease spread here.

It is not just the infectivity that is different.  It is also the death rate.   Simplifying work that is ongoing in this area, it has been reported that COVID19 has a death rate of somewhere around 0.66 % in the general public. This means that for every 200 people infected, approximately 1 will die. In the 1920s approximately 30 % of measles cases were fatal. This means that for every 200 people infected, 60 would die. With improved healthcare and the advent of the measles vaccine this dropped to 0.5 % in developed countries, putting it just slightly lower than the reported COVID19 fatality rate.

Those two paragraphs simply translated mean COVID19 spreads reasonably well and kills some people, measles spreads much more rapidly and kills many more.  This is not to lessen the impact of COVID19 related deaths, not at all.  The whole thing makes for gruesome and tragic watching/reading.  Each death will be associated with immeasurable pain and suffering for those left behind but I ask you to consider how much worse this already awful situation could be. 

The reason we don’t see such huge numbers of deaths for measles as we are for COVID19 is because the world is not totally susceptible to measles. For a long time measles vaccine coverage was high keeping transmission rates low.   As vaccine hesitancy has risen, the uptake of the vaccine has fallen. We cannot and should not sit back and let deadly diseases such as measles re-emerge. It is all of our responsibility to ensure we do everything we can to promote immunisation.

Measles is a deadly, vaccine preventable disease.  By ensuring you are vaccinated, if you can be, you are helping to reduce transmission, protect the vulnerable and prevent needless deaths.

Staffordshire University’s Biological Sciences Students visit Istinye University

A blog written by student Max Clarkson (BSc Hons Pharmaceutical Science, Level 6)

Staffordshire University’s Biological Sciences Students visit Istinye University

Staffordshire University’s Biological Sciences students have just returned from one of Turkey’s largest cities, Istanbul – a city that embodies the country’s complex history and rich culture. In addition to the many tourist attractions within Istanbul (including the Blue Mosque, the Grand Bazaar, and Roman architecture), the city demonstrates well developed systems for healthcare and scientific research. Staffordshire University’s students visited Istinye University, a diverse institution, conducting research into complex topics such as artificial intelligence, stem cell technology, and virology.

Upon arrival to Istinye University (after a scenic, and luckily rather straightforward tram ride) we received a warm welcome from Asst. Prof. Zehra Aydin and her colleges who were very eager to show us around the University’s Topkapi campus.

To begin the tour, we were introduced to Istinye’s Artificial Intelligence laboratory and were surprised at the many applications of machine learning within the biological industry. Staffordshire University students were very excited to discuss the potential use of artificial intelligence in their own future projects – hopefully in collaboration with Istinye!

Students were also given the opportunity to visit various other facilities within Istinye, including: the tissue typing laboratory, the molecular biology laboratory, the cancer research laboratory, the CRISPR and gene editing laboratory and the infectious agent research laboratory. The investment and passion demonstrated towards the resolution of some of the biggest issues we face in the 21st century is enormous – we were quite envious of Istinye’s high-tech equipment!

Molecular Cancer Research Laboratory at Istinye University
Laboratory of Molecular Biology at Istinye University

The next day, Staffordshire students were welcomed behind the scenes of Istinye University Liv Hospital Bahçeşehir and Liv Hospital Ulus. We were very impressed with the relaxed environment and quality of care provided within each hospital – some students were even able to witness this first-hand during a live brain surgery! A surreal representation of what we can achieve together as scientists. Staffordshire students and Staffordshire University’s Dr Ahmad Haidery were also very keen to discuss the stem cell treatments being performed at Istinye University Hospital.  

We had the opportunity to show off our biological knowledge to Prof. Engin Ulukaya – the Dean of Istinye’s Faculty of Health Sciences.

Level 6 Staffordshire University student Uzair presented some of his research on the bacteriophage virus; discussing the potential healthcare applications. Additionally, we had fantastic conversations with researchers at Istinye that are using nano-formulations with novel chemotherapeutics to target cancer cells.

After touring some very impressive facilities we got the opportunity to explore some of the marvels of Istanbul, and eat some great Turkish food, obviously.

The visit to Istinye University is one we will never forget, it has been the experience of a lifetime, we cannot wait to return!

Biological and Biomedical Sciences – Introducing Mascot David AttenBear

During the summer break we saw the arrival of a lone, quiet, little bear at Staffordshire University’s Biological and Biomedical Sciences department. This unexpected mysterious, arrival had no name, no identification, but a lot of curiosity for all things science and eager to gain some hands on experience. Being friendly scientists, and naturally curious ourselves, we welcomed this enthusiastic Ursine (scientific name of bears) to the department. Of course, every great scientist has to start somewhere and we’re more than happy to help them on their journey no matter the species. Our motto is ‘One Biology, One World, Endless Connections’ after all!

Firstly, we needed to enrol our new researcher into the department and for that our little bear colleague needed a name. The Ursine scientist asked if we could pick a name, but picking just one name proved difficult. We decided the best thing to do would be to put the suggested names into a poll for the public to vote. After some time, the votes were counted and there was a very clear winning name. Our excitement grew as we could finally enrol our furry friend but we wanted to get permission from the person whose name we would be using a version of. We know this seems strange but bear with us it’ll all make sense soon.

A letter was written and sent in the post while we all eagerly awaited the response, which we didn’t have to wait long for!

The science bear couldn’t wait to open (although clumsily) the letter to read the good news! The sender who gave their permission you ask? Well that was none other than the brilliant Sir David Attenborough himself! The winning name was David AttenBear, which Sir David was very flattered our fuzzy friend would take a version of his name.

We can now officially introduce our newest member of the Biological and Biomedical Sciences department, David AttenBear. After getting Sir David’s letter, David AttenBear was honoured as he knew of Sir David’s integral work in conservation and inspiring the next generation of scientist all over the world across the 67 years he has worked at the BBC. Now David AttenBear is enrolled he can begin to get his paws into some work experience. Over the coming months we have some exciting opportunities for AttenBear to get involved with and we’ve asked if he can keep us up to date with some blog entries of his own. We hope David will enjoy his stay with us at Staffs and the things we have lined up for him.

Not only to gain some experience of being a scientist but also getting to live the Staffordshire University values we hold dear. Keep an eye out for the upcoming blogs by David AttenBear on his scientific journey with us and you might even bump into our beary enthusiastic friend at a school, college or event near you. Be sure to say ‘Hi!’ and take a picture with David AttenBear and tag us in it @SUBioScience on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram or send an email to Victoria.McQuillan@staffs.ac.uk (Victoria’s helping David get his bearings with researcher life).

Staffs BioSciences Graduate Stories – Meet Zuzana Tothova

In the Biological & Biomedical Sciences department, we celebrate our graduate’s successes with them on graduation day but also as their journeys continue after they leave us. Once you become an alumnus of Staffs and the Biology department you remain a part of our ever-growing family and we take joy in hearing from our alumni throughout their journeys. We value them and their thoughts on their experiences with us at Staffordshire University.

As part of our new series of Staffs BioSciences Graduate Stories, we’re pleased to introduce Zuzana who graduated from our Applied Biomedical Science BSc Hons course in 2013. Find out how Zuzana is getting on with her journey as she shares a little about herself and her experiences with us.

Tell us a little about what you have been doing since graduation?

I’ve been working in the Immunology laboratory at UHNM (University Hospitals of North Midlands) since graduation. At the moment, I’m finishing my Institute of Biomedical Science Specialist Portfolio in Immunology, a qualification necessary to become a specialist Biomedical Scientist (band 6 in the NHS). It took a while, but I’ve had my daughter in the meanwhile and currently, I’m working part-time.

How did your time at Staffordshire University prepare you for life after graduation?

Staffs Uni has enabled me to “put my foot in the door” and secure my job virtually straight after graduation. I’ve learnt an important lesson during my time at Staffs – you will only get as much out of something, as you’ve put into it and, hard work, really does pay off! Most importantly, if you don’t know or understand something, ask! If you don’t ask, you won’t know the answer and the academics really emphasised this during my studies. Continue reading

Celebrating Black History Month – Meet Ugochukwu Uba

Ugochukwu Uba, Biomedical Scientist

I have had a bit of experience in laboratory work as a laboratory technician back home (Nigeria). When I arrived in UK, I started applying for medical laboratory assistant jobs but couldn’t succeed, this was because I did not have any UK experience. That is when I decided to do my studies here in UK all over again- Starting from Access to Higher Education in Science at Stoke on Trent college followed by my undergraduate degree in Biomedical Science at Staffordshire university. In my first year at Staffordshire University we covered modules that prepared us for professional practice of biomedical science. This helped me to get one of the few coveted placements in hospitals to earn me an applied biomedical science route. With this, I completed my professional portfolio which led to HCPC registration.

 After my studies and HCPC registration (thanks to Ian Davies), I started working as a medical laboratory assistant with agencies which gave me the opportunity to gain a bit more experience. I made a lot of applications for BMS jobs and attended a basket full of interviews, but all came back pointing out that I did not have any UK experience. After loads of perseverance, I finally got an offer to become a Biomedical scientist in Haematology and Blood Transfusion.

Reflecting on my experiences at Staffordshire University, I realised that there are challenges associated with African males in terms of acquiring a voice and breaking into fields that are typically Caucasian dominated. The university, however, has many positive initiatives and role models that attempt to bridge the gap. The fact that I was one of the few people that got the opportunity for a university driven hospital placement where I got my professional registration gives evidence to the level playground the university endeavours to give.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month – Meet Ian Muusha

Ian Muusha, Embryologist

I graduated from Staffordshire University in July 2017, with an undergraduate degree in Biomedical Science. During my time at Staffs, I always intended on working within the healthcare sector, whilst helping to save and change lives. As beautiful as being a Biomedical Scientist sounded, I wanted to be more, and so I worked towards becoming a clinical healthcare scientist. After Staffs Uni, I went on to complete master’s degree in Clinical Embryology and Assisted Reproductive Technology.

I have recently just finished my master’s course at Leeds, with a projected grade of a distinction. However, whilst studying, I was approached by a team of vets that had just finished setting up a brand new, state-of-the-art bovine IVF facility and wished for me to come on board as the head embryologist, I accepted! This centre is only one of two in the whole of the U.K., and I get to be at the forefront of it all with a very dedicated team. This is a great achievement to me because I have broken into a field where few members of my ethnic background have had opportunities to break into.

Even though I am currently not working in a human IVF laboratory, I am still utilising all the skills I learned from my time both at Staffordshire University and the University of Leeds. Not only this, but I get to perform sophisticated techniques such as ovum retrieval, ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection) and my favourite – embryo biopsy for genetic analysis. I am immensely proud to be part of the team I work with and performing IVF on cattle for both herd expansion and genetic recovery. However, one day I do hope to eventually work in a human IVF clinic, and if it was not for my varied undergraduate degree from Staffordshire University, I would not be where I am today. Not to mention the support I received from the staff which was integral to my studies at Staffs. Being a student at Staffordshire university helped me fall in love with Science all over again, but it also helped me learn the professional etiquette that the profession carries. Staffs helped me realise my dream.

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month – Meet Alexander Makanga

Alexander Makanga, Senior Biomedical Scientist (Betsi Cadwaladr University Board)

Alex Makanga is one of our illustrious alumni who finished his MSc in Molecular Biology with a merit. He was in the department of Biology and Biomedical Science in the School of Life Sciences and Education. His research project at Staffordshire University was on Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC), a subject that is making headlines in the field of Biomedical Science.

Alexander Makanga is now a Senior Biomedical Scientist in Imunohistrochemistry (IHC) and Special Stains working for Betsi Cadwaladr University Board (BCUHB) Histopathology Department.  He began his Biomedical Science career as a trainee BMS at Sheffield teaching hospital (Royal Hallamshire) and later went to work for Belfast Health and Social Care Trust (Regional Neuropathology Service), followed by North West Wales NHS Trust (NWWT) and Wales Cancer Bank now BCUHB. During his time with NWWT/BCUHB, Alex was involved in the amalgamation of histopathology service across the North Wales region.  He currently participates in research and the lecturing of biomedical science students at University of Bangor.  His main research interest is Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) and pancreatic adenocarcinoma.   The main goal is to improve efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs in TNBC thereby improving patient care. Alex is passionate about molecular genetics and introduction of new immnohistochemical markers, reducing turnaround times while maintaining quality and accuracy of Immunohistochemical stains.   In addition, he actively seeks to foster environment which values learning and collaboration between institutions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Celebrating Black History Month – Meet Natasha Rufurwekuda

Natasha Rufurwekuda, Medical Student

I studied a Biomedical Science degree at Staffordshire University. Initially, I found it difficult to find my feet, but I soon did with the help of my tutor & colleagues. There was a huge group presence on my course, which really helped me gain confidence as I felt supported and included. During my studies at staffs, we were often required to complete presentations as part of our assessments. This is a skill that I still use today as we’re often required to present patient case studies within my degree as a medical student.

After graduation, I managed to obtain a band 4 post as an associate practitioner in the NHS. This was a major achievement for me as positions within the laboratory are usually very competitive. Within 8 months, I had gained my accreditation as a multidisciplinary biomedical scientist. This was a really challenging time for me as a black female trying to break into the biomedical scientist world. I overcame this by working harder than everyone else. Usually, only trainee Biomedical scientists are entitled to complete the training portfolio. However, I approached my employer & promised that I would complete my training portfolio by coming into the lab after my normal working hours. Completing the portfolio wasn’t difficult as I sought guidance from fellow alumni who had gone through the coterminous route. I also kept in touch with my university peer mentor who supported me in completeing my portfolio.

A year later, I got accepted onto a medical degree programme in Bulgaria. Staffordshire university prepared me for this moment because we were always encouraged to be self-motivated, overcome obstacles and lead with confidence. I carried this lesson with me, and it gave me courage that I needed to pursue medicine. I am currently in my 5th year and using knowledge that I acquired during my first degree at Staffs. The solid science background makes it easier to understand things.

Every aspect of my training to become a doctor requires good listening skills. I’ve found myself being very good at listening to patients, particularly when taking patient history. I believe that I naturally developed this skill at Staffs Uni as I had a module that equipped us with life skills, teamwork and professional attributes of the field.

Through study group discussions at Staffs, I developed & realised the importance of social networking skills. A transferable skill that has enabled me to build healthy colleague relationships in the workplace. Additionally, I’ve been able to use this skill in order to connect with & meet doctors & consultants who ultimately have given me work experience opportunities. My personal life is filled with many highlights and moments that have also aided me in developing my career. One of those moments is summing up the courage to move to a foreign country by myself with no friends or family around. However, this experience was made easier as I had previously moved away from home to peruse my 1st degree at Staffs. I suppose this gave me the practise of independence that I would need in future.