Criminogenic Dynamics of the Construction Industry: A State-Corporate Crime Perspective

Dr Jon Davies’ paper in the Journal of White Collar and Corporate Crime “contributes to the state-corporate crime agenda by demonstrating how discussions on criminogenic industry structures provide critical links between organizational processes and broader political-economic dynamics, which is crucial for developing a criminological discourse.”

Read ‘Criminogenic Dynamics of the Construction Industry: A State-Corporate Crime Perspective’ here

Fault lines of food fraud: key issues in research and policy

Jon Davies’Criminology and Sociology Lectuer – co-authored article with Nicholas Lord, Cecilia Flores Elizondo and Jon Spencer is now available. 

“This article analyses three key areas in the literature on food fraud where we see fault lines emerging: 1. food fraud research orientations; 2. food fraud detection and prevention (and the dehumanisation and decontextualisation associated with analytical testing); and, 3. food fraud regulation and criminalisation. We argue that these fault lines raise questions over the plausibility of knowledge on food frauds and in some cases produce specious arguments.”

Read ‘Fault lines of food fraud: key issues in research policyhere

Working, living and dying in COVID times: perspectives from frontline adult social care workers in the UK

Working, living and dying in COVID times: perspectives from frontline adult social care workers in the UK, is available to read here. The co-authored article written by Luke Telford – Criminology and Sociology Lecturer are Staffordshire University – Daniel Briggs and Anthony Ellis aimed ‘to explore 15 UK adult social care workers’ experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic.’ 

Luke said that it is “based on qualitative research with care workers during the pandemic, outlining the state’s failure to adequately protect both staff and vulnerable residents in care homes”

Procedural justice as a reward to the compliant: an ethnography of police–citizen interaction in police custody

Dr Leanne Savigar-Shaw‘s – Lecturer in Policing – author journal on Procedural justice as a reward to the compliant: an ethnography of police–citizen interaction in police custody is now available on Taylor and Francis here

The “paper contributes to the literature on Procedural Justice Theory (PJT) by exploring its capacity to explain the dynamic interactions between police and citizens within the context of police detention.”

The application of tape lifting for microplastic pollution monitoring

Professor Claire Gwinnett (lecturer in Forensics and Director for the Centre for Crime Justice and Security), Amy Osborne (PhD Researcher) and Andrew Jackson (Emeritus Professor) have had paper published, called ‘The application of tape lifting for microplastic pollution monitoring.

Claire said it ‘is a study where we have tested the use of a tape created and patented at Staffordshire University for forensic crime scene work for the us of microplastic recovery’.

 

You can read ‘The application of tape lifting for microplastic pollution monitoring’ on Science Direct, here

The Inconvenient Truth About Mobile Phone Distraction: Understanding the Means, Motive and Opportunity for Driver Resistance to Legal and Safety Messages

Dr Leanne Savigar-Shaw, Policing Lecturer, has co-written an article on driver distraction with Helen Wells and Gemma Briggs. ‘The Inconvenient Truth About Mobile Phone Distraction: Understanding the Means, Motive and Opportunity for Driver Resistance to Legal and Safety Messages’ is on The British Journal of Criminology here.