Moving Into Accommodation: What Do I Need?

All clear and a little sad looking before I leave the room for good.

I’ve moved houses a lot throughout my life, and I moved every year I was living away from home for uni (the first time). Now, I live independently in a flat, and I think I’ve gotten pretty good at it. There are definitely things I forgot to move in with, or didn’t even realise I’d need, and when I moved into uni accommodation I think I actually took too many things. Like a microwave. We had four in the house. Between six of us.

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Assuming you’re moving into uni accommodation, you’ll be provided with things like a toaster, a microwave, instant hot water (or a kettle), a place to do your laundry and a fridge etc., so I’m not going to include those; they are, however, things you should ask about if you’re moving into private accommodation. Otherwise:

Kitchen:

    • Crockery: I’d take two of everything. Two mugs, bowls, plates. Then you’ve got one to wash and one to use.
    • Cutlery: Two of everything except teaspoons which I would honestly just get small set of for cheap. They go missing, they get pinched, and they need washing all the time.
    • Cooking: You don’t want to ask someone else for a saucepan all the time so take your own. You don’t need a whole set but make sure you’ve got like, at least a medium sized frying pan and medium sized saucepan, and a sieve for rice and pasta. Two of those wooden stirry-things are a good shout, and a can-opener. If you drink, take a bottle-opener/corkscrew.
    • Cleaning: You’ll probably end up sharing sponges and dish soap but it’s a nightmare trying to make people chip in for it so if you’ve got your own, at least your stuff is clean. Anti-bacterial wipes are quick and cheap too, if you’d rather use that to wipe down a counter/cooker when you’re done.

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Bathroom:

  • Cleaning you: Obviously soap, shampoo, toothbrush and toothpaste, toilet paper and all that stuff. Take two towels, a hand towel, a flannel if you’re about that. A loofa. I absolutely recommend moving in with these things rather than getting them once you’re there, because it’s a busy day! It’s exciting! Things get forgotten.
  • Cleaning up after you: Those anti-bac wipes will do for your sink and taps if you don’t want to use a sponge and clean-up spray/something, but you should keep your sink clean either way, let’s be real. It’s also handy to have a little box or bag to keep your shampoo etc in so it’s not in anyone’s way, and you can just pop them away if you’re keeping them in your room.

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Bedroom:

  • Bedding: Mattress protector, duvet, pillows, sheets, mattress protector, bedding set. Mattress protector. Get a mattress protector.
  • Clothes/grooming stuff: Obviously. Just be sensible about it. You don’t need to bring your entire wardrobe — you’ll be going home, or family will visit. You’ll have the chance to grab things you leave behind.
  • Decorations: Don’t bring super precious things, they’ll get broken. If not by you, then by someone else. I know you want to make your room yours and decorate it, and you should, just decide if you’ll miss this stuff more if something happens to it or if you leave it at home. I took my PS2 to uni with me the first time and put it in the social area, and it was a bad shout. Of course, bring stuff that’s going to make you feel good in your new space. Have fun with it!
  • Cleaning: Keep your room nice! Maybe take a packet of polishing wipes (cheap/easy) with you so when you’re all moved in, you can give stuff a wipe over and then you don’t have to worry about it.

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So yeah. Basics. There isn’t much that you can’t pick up locally or that you can’t have waiting for you from Chaffinch Student, so don’t panic if you do forget things. Otherwise, I’ll give you the same advice I got when I moved out: Make your bed up first so you can crash when you’re ready, and get your bathroom sorted so you can clean up when you’re done!

Siân
About Siân 28 Articles
I'm Siân, I'm 27, and I'm a third year Creative Writing student. I'd like to be a full-time writer when I grow up, but a career in editing or teaching would do in the meantime.

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