Why Attend Connected Futures?

By jp4,

Written by the Career Studio Team

19-23rd October Connected Futures – Why You Should Get Involved!

Our Coaches, your Peers tell you why!

 For more information and to join the sessions please visit:

https://www.staffs.ac.uk/students/careers/events/connected-futures/home

Amber Porter

 “Personally I think we’re quite lucky Connected Futures is digital this year as it means we have a whole host of different talks from experts in their field that can improve both our career and personal development.  By taking part in Connected Futures you will get the opportunity to connect and network with like minded peers and professionals (Which could help you in the future when job opportunity searching), improve your employability and learn more about your mindset, including how to set and achieve better goals.  REMEMBER, you are capable of anything you set your mind to!

After taking part in Connected Futures last year I was able to connect with employers in my industry and was given the opportunity to shadow the work of one company which helped me make some decisions about the field of work I want to specialise in”

Annie Thompson

“ To enhance your employability skills and ask industry professionals vital questions about work  in different fields”

Rebecca Edwards

 “Connected Futures gives students the opportunity to take part in workshops and seminars that equip them with vital employability skills and the ability to network with industry professionals. There is something for everyone, for example those who want tips on becoming self employed starting a business, those looking for tips for applications and those that would just like to network and get a feel for the industry. No matter what your year of study is, you can learn a lot from this event and have a lot to gain.

Last year at Connected Futures I gained some high quality contacts and continued the networking through LinkedIn after the event. Since then, although I have been studying and not actively seeking a job, these employers in this time have employed students from Staffs, meaning they really do want to invest in our futures and are willing to offer opportunities!”

Megan Arrand

 “It’s a great way for networking with potential future employers even digitally this year. It might seem that there is no-one there who is relevant to you, but you never know who they know in their own networks.”

Bertha Eke

 “At Uni it is important to connect with others in your field of interests.  From my experience, connections create opportunities which can be beneficial to you before heading out into your prospective career.  The university offers different networking – this event in particular so check next week out and make an effort to attend some of the sessions.  This may seem scary at first but being able to create professional relationships with other students, professors and prospective employers on campus is very rewarding and I am sure you will find this valuable.”

To speak to one of our Career Coaches get in touch: 

Email: careers@staffs.ac.uk 

Twitter: @CareersAtStaffs 

Instagram: @CareersAtStaffs 

Facebook: Staffordshire University​ Career & Personal Development 

LinkedIn: @CareersAtStaffs

Career Chat: https://www.staffs.ac.uk/students/careers/careers-studio/chat-to-our-careers-coaches

Digital Connected Futures 19-23rd October 2020

By jp4,

Written by Annie

What is it?

Connected Futures is an annual careers festival held by Staffordshire University, with a host of employers wanting to talk to you! It is being held digitally this year and has a lot of series, presentations taking place every day. 

Why is it useful to me?

It is a chance to engage with employers, boost your skills, ask relevant questions, learn about the industry and give you the best possible chance to increase your employability skills!

What should I expect?

There is a full timetable you can book onto! These are some of the things included;

  1. Self-employment and entrepreneurship which includes the Be Inspired Scheme (Setting up your own business and how you can be supported in doing so), How to manage your money through freelancing and commission and a chance to talk to four staffs graduates that have started their own business!
  2. Personal Transformation this focuses upon developing professionally, planning your career path with the help of the careers studio and personal branding.
  3. Work Experience looks at how important it is to gain valuable work experience, partnerships, volunteering opportunities, how to find work placements and how UniTemps can offer a multitude of placements across all schools.
  4. Networking and Employability Skills, gives you an insight into utilising social media, connecting with people within the industry, meeting professionals and information of what companies look for when recruiting graduates.
  5. Applying and Securing Opportunities assists you in finding out what skills assessment centres look for, employability skills, how to get into the media industry, technical CV’s and strategic application planning.

Everyday there is a live Q&A via Uni Buddy where your careers coaches will be available to ask any questions you may have!

How do I sign up?

The link to sign up is here https://www.staffs.ac.uk/students/careers/events/connected-futures – There is a full time table available and it is all remote!

To speak to one of our Career Coaches get in touch: 

Email: careers@staffs.ac.uk 

Twitter: @CareersAtStaffs 

Instagram: @CareersAtStaffs 

Facebook: Staffordshire University​ Career & Personal Development 

LinkedIn: @CareersAtStaffs

You can now access the Careers Team via chat! Simply click here!

How To Have A Stress-Free Academic Life – Part 2

By Amber,

Written by Bertha

World Mental Health Day 2020

World Mental Health Day 2020 was on Saturday 10th October. More than ever this year people will be more aware of their own mental health, possibly the mental health of others close to them and coping strategies to deal with struggles they may be facing. This is the second part of the series written by Bertha aimed at achieving a stress-free academic life. We understand that everyone is different and some of these tips may not be useful or work for you and that’s okay these suggestions are based on experiences.  

Stress to some degree is a normal part of life, it is only when the amount we are experiencing exceeds our capacity and resources to manage it that we run into difficulty and find ourselves in a vicious cycle of stress. This is a continuation of my two-part blog series. Here are some more tips on having a stress-free academic life.

Zzzz

Maintaining a sleep routine is of paramount importance to mental health and managing stress. Taking time to relax before you go to sleep can help the quality of your sleep. Try to go to sleep at the same time and wake up at the same time each day. Seven to eight hours is recommended.

Stress can often interrupt your sleeping pattern so try to do everything you can to relax yourself before going to bed. Take a bath to wind down, watch your favourite TV show or sit quietly and read. Avoid screen time as much as possible before bed, so switch off laptops, phones and tablets at least an hour before going to sleep. It is very important that you manage your time effectively and develop a good study schedule so that you don’t have to pull an all-nighter before an exam. Going without sleep actually makes it harder to remember facts and learn new things.

Move that body

Exercise can be hugely beneficial for the mind as well as the body. Regular exercise releases endorphins “feel-good hormones” that can help to reduce tension, ease stress and allow the mind to focus on something other than worries and concerns.

This doesn’t have to be a gruelling gym session, you simply need to get your heart racing, for example by going for a brisk walk or a bike ride.

Studies have shown that a regular exercise routine often decreases symptoms of depression and stress. So, say yes to exercise and sports. Routine exercise keeps one fit, relax body joints, reduces fatigue and burns fat. This includes relaxation, deep breathing exercises or guided meditation.

If you’d like to get moving but are struggling for inspiration see what workout classes are available at the University’s gym/sports centre and get involved with clubs and societies. There’s usually a huge array of activities on offer from mountain climbing to dancing, cycling to soccer, basketball to boxing and Zumba classes to yoga.

Eat your greens

Students and junk foods are quite inseparable. If only you knew the dangers of solely depending on junk foods, you won’t consume it the way you do. Junk foods are temporal hunger quenchers that leave you craving for more of it after a short while.

Eating junks reduces your body energy level which is a clear invitation to stress. I am not saying a bite or two is harmful but can be disastrous if it’s your most preferred meal. It is important to consume meals made from whole grains, fruits and vegetables. They play crucial role in cleansing and keeping the body strong to function at its peak.

There are plenty of healthy, quick meals you can make to see you through your studies. Healthy options like fish, dark green vegetables, and whole grains are great brain food for studying.

Know your limits

Boundaries are the limits and guidelines that you set for yourself and for others. They are there to protect you mentally, physically and emotionally. This is why they are so important. They are the standards that you set on how you treat yourself and how others should treat you.

See boundaries like an imaginary fence protecting an extremely beautiful garden and you are the garden because you need protection. You protect yourself by having personal boundaries, learning how and when to say “no” without feeling guilty.

Setting boundaries could be quite uncomfortable because you do not want to upset other people especially the people you care about, but I personally believe that the people that love you and care about you will always respect your boundaries. The people who do not respect your boundaries are the people who are benefiting from you not having a boundary. A very good way to avoid and manage stressful situations is knowing when to say no and sticking to your boundaries. So, learn to say no more often so you don’t take on more than you can handle and incur avoidable stress.

Always ready to help!

Isolation can have an extremely negative impact on your happiness. Speak to your friends and family because they know you best and care about you the most. Also, studies suggest that socialising with a friend just once a week can reduce your stress levels and improve your mood as much as therapy or counselling. 

Alternatively, make an appointment with your student wellbeing service. The university has a supportive wellbeing team who are willing and ready to help and they should be your first port of call if you’re worried, stressed or upset about anything. They’ll provide a listening ear and can signpost you to specialist services who can offer specific support if needed.

You could try speaking to friends, family or your university tutor. A GP is also a good place to start and they can help you with advice or access to treatments if you need them.

No matter how prepared you are for college, you’ll be overwhelmed sometimes. It comes with a lot of stress, from academic to financial to emotional. Students are also among the most likely to need mental health services. But having a strong support system of friends can help as well as knowing where you can find professional guidance. The university’s counselling services can help you whether you’re struggling with academic or other stress.

Please use me

It is important to take advantage of all the range of student services at your disposal. The university offers a wide range of services to help you with your wellbeing, finances, finding a home, academic struggles, getting legal advice and managing childcare responsibilities. From health and welfare to careers and employability, there are always staff who are willing to help. The more you are engaged in learning the basics, the easier you will find to achieve your goals. So, book yourself an appointment and chat with university academic and student centres advisors from time to time and keep yourself on track!

Here’s wishing you a stress-free academic life. Enjoy the ride.

To speak to one of our Career Coaches get in touch:

Email: careers@staffs.ac.uk

Twitter: @CareersAtStaffs

Instagram: @CareersAtStaffs

Facebook: Staffordshire University​ Career & Personal Development

LinkedIn: @CareersAtStaffs

How To Have A Stress-Free Academic Life – Part 1

By Amber,

Written by Bertha

World Mental Health Day 2020

World Mental Health Day 2020 is this Saturday 10th October. More than ever this year people will be more aware of their own mental health, possibly the mental health of others close to them and coping strategies to deal with struggles they may be facing. In support of World Mental Health Day and mental health and wellbeing in general our career coach Bertha has written a two part series including tips on how you can try to achieve a stress-free academic life. 

University life comes with many new experiences, and it is normal to feel overwhelmed. There is a lot of pressure to start your adult life off right, which means a lot of stress- balancing work, studying, and an active social life isn’t easy! But you can take some steps to make your transition and adaptation to the new normal a lot easier. Beginning university can be challenging even for the most relaxed students. For many it’s the first time living away from family, friends and home comforts but there are things you can do to keep the worry at bay.

To many, university life is synonymous to stress. The hurdle of being on time for lectures, working with different kinds of people on group projects, sleepless nights on researches/exams preparation, coursework deadlines, living with strangers you do not get on with, thinking about the future and not to mention the financial stress encountered in keeping up with your university needs; all these can accumulate stress.

Few students can go through all of these stressful activities without breaking down at some point or the other while some can’t cope with them and end up taking a bed in the hospital, especially during semester exam periods when the pressure is at its peak. As a student, the thought of living a stress-free life in campus was unimaginable.

Stress is a natural feeling, designed to help you cope in challenging situations. In small amounts it can be good, because it pushes you to work hard and do your best, such as during exams. But if you’re feeling very stressed or feel you cannot manage stress, it can lead to ‘poor mental health’ such as depression and anxiety. It can also affect your academic performance.

Attending university can be daunting yet exciting. Thinking back to my first year, I can still remember some of my stressful days. I believed there was always a price to pay to achieve anything and academic excellence was no exception. I saw anything not university related as a total waste of my time, I got so engrafted with my coursework that I probably didn’t have a life outside of it. This was in my first year, that “serious year” in every student’s life which served as a foundation for building better grades.

It wasn’t until I had my first major breakdown that I realised the importance of managing my stress levels as a university student. I discovered that I had developed unhealthy habits like eating too much fast food and had a really poor work-life balance which sapped my energy and raised my stress levels. Therefore, I sort for a way out and made amazing discoveries in my second year that it’s possible to live a stress-free life and still make the best grades.

These tips should help you with managing and overcoming academic stress. Make the most of university life & you’ll have the energy to embrace all the great new experiences that come with it and become a better person. This will be a two-part blog series.

 

Know thy environs

It is very important that you familiarise yourself with your new campus. Give yourself time to get to know your campus. Take the time to get to know the university town and surrounding neighbourhoods as well as the city centre and shopping malls. Find all your classes before they start so you don’t feel lost at the beginning of the semester. You could go on campus tours

You could also decorate your accommodation/room to make it feel like home by putting up pictures of your family/friends on wall or just decorating with items that will remind you of home so you can cope better and won’t get home sick.

Make plans!

I am sure that you know the famous “if you fail to plan, you plan to fail”, this is so true especially at Uni. Make an effort to plan your time to help you keep track of your work. Break it down into manageable chunks so you can keep up with deadlines. Create a proper schedule that will help you manage your academics and other activities in a more efficient manner.

For most modules, you’ll get a course outline detailing everything you’ll cover along with the due dates for assignments and coursework. Take note of everything expected of you this semester and log your due dates in a planner, make time every day to study and stay on top of your work. Those dates come up fast, so keeping a regular study schedule can help you hit your deadlines without feeling overwhelmed.

Tick tock goes the clock

Making plans goes hand in hand with managing your time effectively. People often get stressed when they feel that they’re running out of time to complete something. However, simple time management techniques can help you to feel relaxed and focused.

Try creating a written work schedule, breaking your tasks down into manageable chunks and planning accordingly. Divide your work into urgent and non-urgent tasks, and important and non-important tasks.

One of the best ways to make study time is to stick to a schedule. That means if you don’t have a class until noon, waking up at 8:00 am gives you four hours to eat a good meal, get in some exercise, and make time for your studies. It’s tempting to set your schedule by your class times, but it also means you’re always chasing the clock. Keeping a consistent routine throughout the week means you’ll always have time to spare.

Know what works for you

It is crucial for you to understand your unique study style. This in essence is the study style which works for you. Different people learn in different ways. If you’re worried about your course workload, you could speak to your tutor about this and start a study group if need be. Learn how you work best: do you get work done sharing ideas in a group, or will other ideas and voices just distract you? Do you need to study in long or short blocks of time? Do you study best by writing notes or listening to lectures? Spend time with your school’s academic counsellors to figure out the study style that works best for you. Understand your academic capabilities, what is expected of you and try not to have unreasonable expectations.

Money makes the world go round!

One of the more unpleasant experiences of university life is paying your own bills and managing your own finances or trying to stick to a really tight budget. This goes to show that indeed independence comes with a price. At university, if you are unable to manage your money well then you will often go broke and this certainly will stress you out because you may be unable to purchase the things that you need. Try to avoid spending impulsively and get only the things that are necessary for your course or upkeep. Save money by purchasing pre-owned items and taking advantage of student discounts. You’ll be amazed by all the places you can get one.

Carry your ID card everywhere to take advantage of any discounts exclusive to students only as most places will insist on seeing your student card. Budgeting is also very important because you will be able to set aside money for only necessary expenses. Make sure to budget for fun things too so you don’t need to worry after a little splurge.

Work work work work work work

It can be tough to balance work and school in Uni. I often consider going to Uni as a full-time job which means that any job I take on by the side has to be part time. Don’t let yourself get overwhelmed. Securing a part-time job could help you earn some extra cash to support yourself while in Uni. On-campus jobs could give you the opportunity of having a flexible work schedule. You could find available part-time and on-campus jobs on Unitemps and MyCareer. Furthermore, the career and personal development team at the University are available to support you in finding and applying for jobs.

No man is an island

At Uni, it is important to connect with others in your field of interests. From my experience, connections create opportunities which can be beneficial to you before heading out into your prospective career. The University offers different networking events from time to time so do check them out and make an effort to attend some of them. This may seem scary at first but being able to create professional relationships with other students and professors on campus is very rewarding and I am sure you will find it valuable.

Make new friends and try new things at uni. Developing new skills and bonding at events whether online or face-to-face is a great way to develop lifelong friendships and connections. Studying is also important, so creating new friendships and experiencing everything the campus has to offer means keeping a good work-life balance. That skill will be important long after graduation. The connections and friendships you make are as important to your mental health as good grades are to your future.

It’s obvious that you aren’t an island but human, so start acting like one and relate with people. This goes a long way in relieving you from academic stress because it’s shared. Come out of your shell and recognize the fact that a load too heavy for one to bear may not be when shared amongst two or more persons. Being with friends takes your mind off stress and gives you something else to think of other than school stress.

Furthermore, cultivating a healthy relationship with your lecturers and course tutors will help you feel more relaxed and comfortable in class. You’ll find the relationships between students and university lecturers are often less formal than you’re used to, but you should still be respectful and attentive of their time. Get to know your professors. Building a connection doesn’t have to just mean popping by their office to chat either. You should also get to know their office hours and participate in class discussions. This could be favourable for you if you need them to write a reference for you or give a recommendation.

To be continued…

Staffs Mentoring

By jp4,

Written by Laura Cope

Staffs mentoring is a brilliant and friendly new peer mentoring scheme where first year students can be matched with a mentor to help them settle into university life in these unprecedented times. We currently have around 300 returning students that have reached out, and are ready to offer guidance to this year’s new students.

As a mentee the benefits you will receive are:

  • Feeling supported in a time of change
  • Having someone to talk to
  • Meeting new people
  • Increasing confidence
  • Getting the most out of University life
  • Help to succeed and achieve your goals

You may want to ask questions like: 

  • My laptop is broken, where can I get it fixed? 
  • I’m a little homesick – how did you overcome it? 
  • Where do I go for help with my studies? 
  • I’m struggling with my finances and have spent my loan, where can I get help? 
  • I haven’t got all of the items for my flat/bedroom, what shops are best for students on a budget? 
  • My course isn’t meeting my expectations, how best to approach an academic? 
  • I am already struggling; how do I access the wellbeing service at the university? 
  • I want to meet new people, what is the best way to get involved in university life? 
  • I like to keep fit and play sport, can you tell me more? 
  • I’m scared to go out on my own, what do you suggest? 
  • I am looking for a part time job, how can I begin to look for one? 

Whilst being hugely beneficial to mentees, mentors are also able to develop skills to help them with their future employability.

If you would like to be a mentee and have a mentor to help support and guide you, or you would just like to meet new people and have a chat, you can register here https://bit.ly/2GAhPVx or by email mentoring@staffs.ac.uk.

To speak to one of our Career Coaches get in touch: 

Email: careers@staffs.ac.uk 

Twitter: @CareersAtStaffs 

Instagram: @CareersAtStaffs 

Facebook: Staffordshire University​ Career & Personal Development 

LinkedIn: @CareersAtStaffs

Careers On The MyStaffsUni App

By Amber,

Written by Meg

When coming to university, the MyStaffsUni app is the ideal place for seeing your timetable, seeing a campus map to find out which building a certain room is in, and also to access your student email. At the Career Studio, we too like to make use of the app and we have our own tile.

 

The Career Studio Tile

 

 

At the moment, our tile can be used to view updates regarding the Career Studio, see how we are handling the current Covid-19 circumstances, and last but not least, our ‘Hot Jobs of the Week’. However, this is soon to become a bigger and better tile as we implement new ideas.

Using the Career Studio tile can already be useful for seeing any part-time jobs, placement opportunities and graduate opportunities that we believe are worth highlighting. This is updated on a weekly basis so remember to keep your eyes peeled. Nevertheless, we don’t plan on stopping there.

 

So how can this tile be useful to me?

Over the upcoming weeks, we plan to add school specific pages into our tile, so it becomes more tailored to you. These pages will include relevant placement opportunities, graduate opportunities and any events that may be taking place in your school. We will also link school-specific blogs for you to read. Similarly, there will be a tab for more generalised blogs that can aid your personal development in other areas that may not directly be related to your chosen subject, but still hold great relevance for future career prospects.

 

Our tile is updated frequently so it would be worth checking on a regular basis to ensure you don’t miss out on any opportunities. Should you require any assistance applying for an opportunity then get in contact with us if you would like help with a CV / application / covering letter. Good luck!

 

To speak to one of our Career Coaches get in touch:

Email: careers@staffs.ac.uk

Twitter: @CareersAtStaffs

Instagram: @CareersAtStaffs

Facebook: Staffordshire University​ Career & Personal Development

LinkedIn: @CareersAtStaffs

Welcome To The Digital Careers Studio

By Amber,

Written by Amber

The Career Studio is run by students, offering Peer to Peer Coaching to their fellow students and graduates. This approach means coaches can offer insights into university life, balancing work and study and achieving their career and personal goals based on their own experiences. Also, they understand the challenges and difficulties you are either currently facing or will face in the future. Our aim as a service is to make sure you are feeling 100% prepared for whatever challenges you face while still at uni or when you leave.

 

 

Recently, we started the ‘Digital Career Studio’ to make sure you could still access the support you require for your career and personal development. Whether you prefer to contact us via email or phone, or you would prefer a face-to-face meeting we have got you covered! Even working from home we have been able to offer virtual face-to-face meetings via Microsoft Teams, phone calls, emails and now a ‘live chat’ service through Unibuddy so you can still receive the level of support you would have had in the studio.

 

Check out our services below and find the option that works best for you. We look forward to hearing from you all soon!

 

 

To speak to one of our Career Coaches get in touch:

Email: careers@staffs.ac.uk

Twitter: @CareersAtStaffs

Instagram: @CareersAtStaffs

Facebook: Staffordshire University​ Career & Personal Development

LinkedIn: @CareersAtStaffs

How Joining A Club Or Society Can Make You More Employable

By Amber,

Written by Becky

People often dismiss hobbies and interests as relevant information for your CV, but there are in fact a lot of transferrable skills which you develop in activities that you can use in the workplace! We offer a variety of clubs and societies at Staffordshire University, including but not limited to the following…

  • Sports clubs such as football, boxing, rugby, lacrosse and netball.
  • Societies such as poker, mental health and wellbeing, film and media, debating and amateur dramatics.

As well as the teams above, we also have a cheerleading club on campus, which I have been a member of since 2015. During this time, I began coaching the team and then progressed to the role of head coach and was elected president. As well as president, there are other committee roles you can have as part of a society, such as finance and social secretary. Having a position on a committee further develops your skills useful for the workplace, such as leadership, goal setting and time management.

I have adapted the skills learned from being on a sports team to help me with my work as careers coach, an example of this would be active listening. Being on a team, you get to know the members really well and confide in eachother, sharing experiences and support. This has equipped me to listen to the students who seek careers advice and understand their situations and goals. Being a cheerleading coach has helped me to accurately set tasks and goals for people to reach their potential.

Cheerleading support the other sports teams on campus, including the American football team, Staffordshire Stallions, who we have worked closely with for many years. I have spoken to past members of both teams to give you an insight into what skills they have developed which they now use in their successful careers!

 

“During my time as a cheerleader, I learnt the value of team work. How you have to work as a team to achieve your goal. Our goal for the year 2005/2006 was to compete in our first ever cheerleading competition. As a team we worked so hard and practiced every day, until our competition routine was perfect. That year we competed in our first ever competition and came 2nd in our group. The thing about team work is that you may not all be friends, you may not even all get along but you all want to achieve the same desired outcome. My current role as a CSI relies heavily on team work, not only at complex crime scenes, where you and your colleagues are there for hours and hour’s painstakingly recovering and recording evidence but also on a day to day basis. Being the treasurer for the team taught me the responsibly of paying bills, as simple as it sounds. If a minibus wasn’t arranged and paid for then there were no cheerio’s going to the game that Sunday!”

– Beth Nurse, Scarlettes Treasurer 05-06, currently working as a Senior CSI for West Yorkshire Police and a Teacher Practitioner in Crime Scene Science at the University of Lincoln.

 

“During my time at University I was a member of the Staffordshire Stallions American Football Team. Playing for the team has helped develop my professional skills for work in the legal sector. The sector demands a high level of self-confidence, as well as stamina, and perseverance; all of which are vital attributes for American football. I was also a member of the Law Society, which aided my professional development in a more direct way. The Society organised a number of networking events and competitions, which gave me the opportunity to practice key professional legal skills with a view to becoming a Barrister.”

– Harry Ball, Staffordshire Stallions, currently working in the legal sector.

 

“It would be easy to roll off the cliche comments that my time on a Uni sports team gave me ‘good team work skills’ or ‘built my confidence’. Yes these are key employment skills however when I reflect on my time on the team they are not actually the key elements that got me to my current situation today. The key skill I developed and use every single day is that of ‘communication’. Whether with league officials, union administrators or most importantly my teammates, University Sports at Staffs gave me opportunity time and time again to head out of my comfort zone and develop into a confident speaker and communicator. A skill I could not work without, and a skill that in all truth, was developed far more by my love of a team and sport than the academia I joined Staffordshire University to pursue.”

– James Tucker, Stallions President 01-04, working as an Assistant Head Teacher.

 

“I joined cheer because it was good for exercise and it was a social thing to do and a good way to make new friends. I then chose to join the committee in my final year after I had built up confidence throughout the 2 previous years of doing cheer. It’s developed my leadership skills and helped me grow in confidence. It’s helped further develop my organisational skills and teamwork. Getting to work with the other committee members, coaches, other cheerleaders and the union is very rewarding. Being on the cheer committee gives me a sense of pride in myself and the whole team.”

– Becky Bates, Scarlettes President 20-21, currently studying BA (Hons) Events Management at Staffordshire University.

 

As well as boosting your employability skills, joining a club or society can increase your confidence, encourage you to be more active and also meet a lot of new people who you share common interests with! For more information please visit https://www.staffsunion.com/getinvolved/clubsandsocieties/

 

The careers studio is still operating digitally and our coaches are available for appointments every week day from 10-6pm. Please book an appointment through MyCareer or email us at careers@staffs.ac.uk. We can help you build a CV that reflects all of your experiences and skills, prepare you for interviews and help you find opportunities suited to your ambitions and interests!

 

To speak to one of our Career Coaches get in touch:

Email: careers@staffs.ac.uk

Twitter: @CareersAtStaffs

Instagram: @CareersAtStaffs

Facebook: Staffordshire University​ Career & Personal Development

LinkedIn: @CareersAtStaffs

Life As A University Student: Working On Campus

By Amber,

Written by Annie

Throughout my time at Staffordshire university I have always had a job role on campus which has provided great benefits for my busy schedule and enabled me to continuously commit myself to my work commitments whilst balancing my studies. I have been fortunate enough to be able to secure a multitude of roles working within the students union and with Unitemps as a student ambassador and careers coach for the careers studio. I work two/three jobs whilst studying, however the flexibility of these roles all being on campus allows me to continue to keep my studies a priority. 

 

Benefits to working on Campus 

  • Flexible shift patterns  
  • Insight into how the University Runs  
  • Perfect Locations 
  • Balance studies alongside working  
  • Opportunity to enhance skill set 
  • Available to work across departments  
  • Role progression  

 

My Experience

Working for the Students Union 

My first role I acquired whilst being at the university was a job as venue staff at the Ember Lounge. Working for the students union enables me to be at the hub of all activity on campus, I have great knowledge of the unions student services, all that they offer to the students and activities that keep the student lifecycle running. I have been able to become a team leader whilst working at the students union and delegate tasks on shift to my colleagues and also become involved in aspects of recruitment such as core competencies for union staff. I have had the opportunity to be an interviewer on recruitment days and secure new intakes of staff across venue departments, this gave me a professional insight into the way in which the organisation runs. Working at Ember has also given me a chance to enhance my skill set there are various qualifications available such as food safety, fire training, terrorism training, and other courses that are accredited to boost your employability. The students union enables flexibility and works around your studies enabling the development of transferable skills and the option to pick up shifts in other departments. Whilst working with the SU I have been able to take shifts at Ember, Greenpad, LRV and Squeezebox which gave me experience in a multitude of different departments under the Unions services. This student role gives a diverse aspect to your CV as there are many opportunities given to working on campus and getting involved within the university community. 

Working for Unitemps 

Within Staffordshire university we have a recruitment agency Unitemps which posts amazing job opportunities available within the university and for other companies advertising roles for graduates, part time, work experience and placements.  

Student Ambassador 

 I found the role of student ambassador advertised on their website and it is extremely student friendly. As a student ambassador there are so many diverse roles and jobs you can sign up for and it is all within a calendar every month that is sent out. You decide if you want to work every month and can sign up to any job that is sent out on their calendar, there is also no worry of balancing your commitments as if you have deadlines or other things to attend in the month you do not have to commit yourself to the roles. As an ambassador I have had the opportunity to work open days, graduation, big events on campus, clearing hotlines and UCAS fairs. This gives you a great opportunity to pick up a multitude of skills and work in various roles. As a student yourself you find it easy to assist other students with any queries they may have and you know the campus well, this facilitates signposting students and those who visit the campus on event days to ensure they have a positive experience and really find what they are looking for. This role is within campus with options to travel to different locations and represent Staffordshire university in different events, they have a lovely supportive team and with any queries about the role or the way it works Unitemps are readily available to answer any queries.  

Careers Coach 

I found the role of a careers coach through the Unitemps website. I have been in the role for just over a year now and have been able to commit myself to my personal and professional development through a supportive management team with the ability to work independently. As a new concept the Careers studio was opened to start peer to peer mentoring for students on campus, this included help across all areas of career planning, CV’s, cover letters, applications and mock interviews. Being a careers coach enables me to pass on knowledge and utilise my research skills to help students in every stage of the student lifecycle. It also allows me to input my experience as a student to continue to promote the careers studio and assist any past/present students that wants to interact with the careers studio. This has benefited me as it has given me an insight into how to plan and start my career alongside what I need to work on to get me onto a career pathway. Working with my colleagues which are other students has allowed a collaborative team working style from a multitude of specialist subjects at all levels and this is what makes the role beneficial to the university and the students its provided for. Within this role I have been given the chance to work on my own project and apply transferable skills to collaborate with managers in the university departments, this is an opportunity I would not have been given if I did not work a student role within a university.  

 

How can this help me in the long run? 

Working within student roles gives you more opportunities to progress. The university roles and the student union understand your work is a priority and you are here to complete your studies but there is also a massive element of continuous support. They look after your interests in terms of your personal and professional development and provide opportunities to gain extra qualifications, enhance your skill set and work within various roles to experience different work settings.  

 

To speak to one of our Career Coaches get in touch:

Email: careers@staffs.ac.uk

Twitter: @CareersAtStaffs

Instagram: @CareersAtStaffs

Facebook: Staffordshire University​ Career & Personal Development

LinkedIn: @CareersAtStaffs

Unitemps is Staffordshire University’s own in-house recruitment service

By jp4,

Unitemps Manager, James Mathers

“Unitemps would like to welcome back all students for this very different 2020/21 academic year. Whilst lockdown has I’m sure been tough for many across the university I am pleased to say we are starting to see a resurgence in the local job market as companies start to implement new ways of working, such as virtual roles and internships.

If you are not quite sure who we are and what we do, Unitemps is Staffordshire University’s own in-house recruitment service designed to help you gain employability skills and find part time work and graduate opportunities. We offer various work opportunities throughout the year, giving you complete flexibility to choose assignments that suit your skills, availability and career aims.

We are with you every step along the way throughout your time at university. Whether it be completing part-time vacancies around campus, gaining valuable experience through paid Student Internships, or taking your career to the next level with one of our Graduate Internship positions. Our highly experienced consultants are able to provide you with the best service possible and work with you to find a role that suits you.

We are operational in 17 different University’s across the UK allowing you the opportunity to see a number of new and exciting roles across the country.

We have a host of new internal opportunities for students set to launch in October and a constant stream of student and graduate roles coming through on a daily basis. For more information on this and to receive up to date job alerts visit www.unitemps.com to get registered!

We hope to be back on campus soon however if you need us in the meantime you can e-mail unitemps@staffs.ac.uk . Best of luck for this academic year and we hope to see you all soon!”

To speak to one of our Career Coaches get in touch: 

Email: careers@staffs.ac.uk 

Twitter: @CareersAtStaffs 

Instagram: @CareersAtStaffs 

Facebook: Staffordshire University​ Career & Personal Development 

LinkedIn: @CareersAtStaffs