Culture 3.0: Arts, Culture, Diversity and Gatekeeping

On 21 September 2020 Carola Boehm (Professor of Arts and Higher Education, Staffordshire University) delivered a 15 minutes introductory session on Culture 3.0 concepts, and how they relate to the challenges of making arts and culture more accessible and more diverse.

It provides a good introduction to Luigi Sacco’s Culture 3.0 concepts, and Carola’s own application of these concepts to the UK creative industry contexts.

Abstract

The homicide of George Floyd in America, the Black Lives Matter and #MeToo campaigns have increased both the urgency and the profile of tackling discrimination, exclusionary practices, and institutionalised racism and thus provide a momentum that allows us all to push harder towards  achieving a more inclusive society with fair and equal access to our arts and culture sectors.. In this talk, I will not only explore the details of existing inequalities but put forward solutions for  shaping arts and culture towards becoming more diverse.

My own area is music technology, in general dominated by individuals who identify as being male. The whole cultural music sector, including classical music, has only 32% female artists. Museums on the other hand have 57%. Dance is an artistic practice that has the highest diversity with 18% BME workforce, compared to Museum having the lowest with 6%. Theatre and Visual Arts have the highest of LGBT artists with 9% with Museums only having 3%. This can also be sliced geographically, with  London having the highest diversity (15% BME), the Southwest having the lowest (6%), Midlands having the highest workforce (53%) identifying as female and London the lowest (42%) (ACE, 2019)

As individual creative professionals we often tend to think that the arts are ‘colour-blind’, but increasingly we have to accept that our cultural organisations, our creative funding models and our markers of quality provide barriers of access that are unevenly distributed in society. In this talk, I will present some initiatives and projects that Staffordshire University is carrying out in this area, all aimed to support Equality, Diversity and Inclusion challenges within our arts and cultural sectors. Terms I will use in this talk are co-production, cultural democracy, co-ownership and “Culture 1.0 to 3.0 ecosystems” (Boehm, 2016, 2017).

ACE (2019). Equality, Diversity and the Creative Case. A data report. ACE 2018 – 2019. [Online]. Manchester. Available from: https://www.artscouncil.org.uk/sites/default/files/download-file/ACE_DiversityReport_Final_03032020_0.pdf.

Boehm, C. (2016). Academia in Culture 3.0: A Crime Story of Death and Birth (but also of Curation, Innovation and Sector Mash-ups). REPERTARIO: Teatro & Danca. 19 (2). p.pp. 37–48.

Boehm, C. (2017). The end of a Golden Era of British Music? Exploration of educational gaps in the current UK creative industry strategy. In: R. Hepworth-Sawyer, J. Hodgson, J. Paterson, & R. Toulson (eds.). Innovation In Music: performance, production, technology and business. Taylor & Francis/Routledge.

The ‘Keep Talking’ in lockdown podcast

A new podcast highlights the pioneering work of community researchers tackling poverty in Stoke-on-Trent.The new podcast Keep Taking About… looks at the role of a community researcher, identifies some of the challenges they have overcome, both in their own lives and throughout the global pandemic, and how they have built a community which has supported the group’s wellbeing and cohesion.

Nicola Gratton, the Lead for Civic Engagement and Evaluation at Staffordshire University, led the project in which community researchers continued to engage with the Keep Talking project in a range of creative ways, including poetry, photography and baking – even creating a book of recipes that helped people through lockdown. They share these experiences in the podcast series which covers isolation, disability, creativity, friendship and family, and community.

A full press release can be read here https://www.staffs.ac.uk/news/2020/08/community-researchers-keep-talking-in-lockdown-podcast

Ass Prof Fiona Graham releases a podcast about an iconic WW1 crater

Not Just A Big Hole in France is a podcast recorded during a walk around the newly accessible Hawthorn Crater on The Somme with Associate Professor and former BBC Producer Fiona Graham and Historian and First World War tunnelling expert Colin Winn.

The first day of the Battle of the Somme is infamous in British military history. Unique access to this heritage site in France combined with scientific and film technology methodologies are creating new knowledge about the battlefield. Graham led the documentary narrative in an international interdisciplinary team of forensic archaeologists, historians, chemists, and film makers to uncover and archive the Hawthorn Crater at Beaumont.

The podcast is a short insight into the project and provides a glimpse into the project and its impact to its surrounding communities.

The full press release can be read at at https://www.staffs.ac.uk/news/2020/06/not-just-a-big-hole-in-france-researchers-uncover-secrets-of-iconic-ww1-crater

Dr Agata Lulkowska receives an international award for her work in film

Dr Agata Lulkowska has been selected from among the highest-ranked articles of the year to receive the annual International Award for Excellence from The Journal of Communication and Media Studies.

Her article Voice of the Arhuacos: Transcending the Borders of “Indigenous” Filmmaking in Colombia was identified as outstanding by members of the Communication and Media Studies Research Network.

Read more about this at https://www.staffs.ac.uk/news/2020/06/film-lecturer-wins-international-award

Heatwork

Heatwork is an Arts Council funded project brining together experimental music and video composers alongside local and international musicians. The first performance of Heatwork took place on 15th Noivember 2019 at Middleport Pottery, a working industrial site housing many craft businesses. Interviews of people involved in the industry were used to create electronic sounds which were played live alongside the Brass Band and Clarient soloist. Marc Estibeiro composed the piece, which was performed by Matthias Müller, on his SABRE system, and the championship TCTC Group brass Band. Live visuals were performed by Dave Payling using his own footage and supported by additional films from Staffordshire Film Archive and BCB Festival.

Heatwork has its own project webpages at http://blogs.staffs.ac.uk/c3centre/projects/heatwork/